Chronic Conditions

PULMONARY DISEASE

A common lung disorder in which inflammation causes the bronchi to swell and narrow the airways, creating breathing difficulties that may range from mild to life-threatening.

Frequently Ask Questions

PULMONARY DISEASE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PULMONARY ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION (PAH) PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS PAIN MANAGEMENT OSTEOARTHRITIS (OA) MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (MS) CANCER HYPERLIPIDEMIA HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) HEPATITIS C GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY Type I and Type II Diabetes CYSTIC FIBROSIS (CF) CROHN’S DISEASE (CD) AND ULCERATIVE COLITIS (UC) Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

Frequently Ask Questions

Asthma :

A common lung disorder in which inflammation causes the bronchi to swell and narrow the airways, creating breathing difficulties that may range from mild to life-threatening. Symptoms include shortness of breath, cough, wheezing, and chest tightness.

The types and doses of asthma medications you need depend on your age, your symptoms, the severity of your asthma and medication side effects. Because your asthma can change over time, a Pharmacist from Allure will work closely with your doctor to track your symptoms and adjust your asthma medications, as needed.

Asthma Medications:

 

Category Purpose Medication types
Long-term asthma control medications Taken regularly to control chronic symptoms and prevent asthma attacks — the most important type of treatment for most people with asthma
  • Inhaled corticosteroids
  • Leukotriene modifiers
  • Long-acting beta agonists (LABAs)
  • Theophylline
  • Combination inhalers that contain both a corticosteroid and a LABA
Quick-relief medications (rescue medications) aken as needed for rapid, short-term relief of symptoms — used to prevent or treat an asthma attack
  • Short-acting beta agonists such as albuterol
  • Ipratropium (Atrovent)
  • Oral and intravenous corticosteroids (for serious asthma attacks)
Medications for allergy-induced asthma Taken regularly or as needed to reduce your body’s sensitivity to a particular allergy-causing substance (allergen)
  • Allergy shots (immunotherapy)
  • Omalizumab (Xolair)

COPD :

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by chronic obstruction of lung airflow that interferes with normal breathing and is not fully reversible.

COPD Medications:

  • Bronchodilators :These medications — which usually come in an inhaler — relax the muscles around your airways. This can help relieve coughing and shortness of breath and make breathing easier. Depending on the severity of your disease, you may need a short-acting bronchodilator before activities, a long-acting bronchodilator that you use every day or both.
  • Inhaled steroids: Inhaled corticosteroid medications can reduce airway inflammation and help prevent exacerbations. Side effects may include bruising, oral infections and hoarseness. These medications are useful for people with frequent exacerbations of COPD.
  • Combination inhalers: Some medications combine bronchodilators and inhaled steroids.
  • Oral steroids: For people who have a moderate or severe acute exacerbation, short courses (for example, five days) of oral corticosteroids prevent further worsening of COPD. However, long-term use of these medications can have serious side effects, such as weight gain, diabetes, osteoporosis, cataracts and an increased risk of infection.
  • Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors: A new type of medication approved for people with severe COPD and symptoms of chronic bronchitis. This drug decreases airway inflammation and relaxes the airways. Common side effects include diarrhea and weight loss.
  • Antibiotics: Respiratory infections, such as acute bronchitis, pneumonia and influenza, can aggravate COPD symptoms. Antibiotics help treat acute exacerbations.

Smoking cessation :

The most essential step in any treatment plan for COPD is to stop all smoking. It’s the only way to keep COPD from getting worse — which can eventually reduce your ability to breathe. Talk to an Allure Pharmacist about nicotine replacement products and medications that might help, as well as how to handle relapses.